Pleasant aroma helps quit smoking, University of Pittsburgh research team finds new way to deal with smoking problem

Pleasant aroma helps quit smoking, University of Pittsburgh research team finds new way to deal with smoking problem

According to a report by oane.ws on January 5, the latest findings from a research team at the University of Pittsburgh show that aroma may play a key role in controlling nicotine dependence.

The study, conducted by John Williams and colleagues, explains this effect through two mechanisms. First, it points to an associative mechanism related to classical theory. Specific odors are associated with specific situations and may elicit corresponding responses. This means that the pleasant aroma that accompanies quitting smoking may create associations with feelings of contentment and relaxation, thereby replacing the habit of smoking.

Secondly, the effect of aroma on brain function constitutes the second mechanism. Research shows that aroma activates areas of the brain responsible for memory, emotion and reward systems, increasing levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter responsible for feelings of contentment and happiness. Therefore, the aroma helps to enhance the sense of pleasure and reduce the desire to smoke.

Experiments have confirmed that pleasant smells, including tobacco aroma, significantly reduce the desire to smoke. Participants reported that the smell of tobacco provided a sense of pleasure that led to reduced smoking. This provides evidence for the use of pleasantly scented scented bars and bottles as an effective means of combating nicotine dependence.

However, it's worth noting that reactions to smells vary from person to person. A scent that one person finds pleasant and effective may not be effective for another, or may even cause negative feelings. Therefore, it is crucial to take individual preferences and reactions into consideration when choosing a scent.
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